Skip to content
This website uses cookies to help us understand the way visitors use our website. We can't identify you with them and we don't share the data with anyone else. If you click Reject we will set a single cookie to remember your preference. Find out more in our privacy policy.
Our work
Our work

Gulp: highlighting LGBTQIA+ experiences of eating disorders

By promoting the stories of LGBTQIA+ people with eating disorders we aim to help health and social care organisations adopt a different approach to LGBTQIA+ eating disorder services.

Health and social care organisations could be doing more to relieve the unique pressures that LGBTQIA+ people face when accessing eating disorder support.

‘Gulp’ is a zine showcasing the unheard stories – through art, poetry and writing – of LGBTQIA+ people with eating disorders (or complex relationships with food and/or their bodies).

By promoting the stories of LGBTQIA+ people with eating disorders, we aim to help health and social care organisations adopt a different approach to thinking about LGBTQIA+ eating disorder services.

Download and read Gulp – a zine telling the stories of LGBTQIA+ people with eating disorders.

How

We will be bringing together people from healthcare, eating disorder support and LGBTQIA+ organisations at a digital event later in summer 2020 to discuss the issues raised in the stories and to help start a new approach to LGBTQIA+ eating disorder services. Register for the event now. 

Why

Eating disorder services and LGBTQIA+ organisations in the UK are not giving enough attention to LGBTQIA+ experiences of eating disorders. Stonewall’s LGBT in Britain report states that one in eight LGBT people and one in four non-binary people experienced an eating disorder in 2018 alone, but when researching for this project, we couldn’t find a single support service or research paper dedicated solely to this issue in the UK.

LGBTQIA+ young people are at significantly higher risk of developing eating disorders than their heterosexual peers, but LGBTQIA+ experience is not reflected in health policy, resource allocation or research areas. By showcasing personal stories in an authentic and creative way, we hope to bring healthcare organisations and LGBTQIA+ support groups together, heighten their awareness of the problem and encourage them to start collaborating.


This project is a part of Kaleidoscope’s Perspectives Programme, an internship scheme focused on promoting unheard voices in health and care.


Our work